An Insight into Population Health Management
healthcaretechoutlook

An Insight into Population Health Management

By Healthcare Tech Outlook | Tuesday, January 28, 2020

Population Health Management looks to progress the health outcome of a group by examining and recognizing individual patients within the grouping. Characteristically, PHM makes use of a Business Intelligence (BI) tool to sum data and offer a comprehensive clinical picture of each patient.

FREMONT, CA: Population Health Management (PHM) refers to the acquisition of patient information across several health information technology sources, the examination of that data into an individual, actionable patient record, and the effects through which care providers can boost both clinical and economic outcomes.

Furthermore, PHM involves applying public health theories to chronic disease management with comprehensive data analysis. Its purpose includes seeking methods to perk up patient outcomes and control overall expenditure.

How it Works

Population Health Management looks to progress the health outcome of a group by examining and recognizing individual patients within the grouping. Characteristically, PHM makes use of a Business Intelligence (BI) tool to sum data and offer a comprehensive clinical picture of each patient. Through the data, providers can track and confidently improve clinical outcomes while lowering costs.

An industry-leading PHM program brings financial, clinical, and operational data together from across the organization and renders actionable analytics for providers to help boost efficiency and patient care. Delivering on the idea of PHM needs a robust risk stratification infrastructure and care management, a well-managed partnership network, and a cohesive delivery system.

While data might be used individually by every practice or hospital, hardly ever is the same BI tool used across the gamut of care like hospital inpatient, outpatient, and ambulatory settings. Even less comprehensive is a BI tool that integrates data on physician billing, medical claims, Electronic Health Records (EHR), labs, and pharmacies.

A thriving PHM program will present real-time insights to both administrators and clinicians and help them to recognize and address care gaps in the patient population. Additionally, a well-developed care management program is the key to cost-saving and better outcomes, mainly in populations with chronic disease.

Care management is a vital component of PHM. While its objectives can vary from organization to organization, they tend to spin around progressing patient self-management, enhancing medication management, and dropping the cost of care.

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