Future Pandemics and How Can We Avert Them
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Future Pandemics and How Can We Avert Them

Healthcare Tech Outlook | Friday, June 10, 2022

At any given point in time, countless deathly viruses are existing in the animal kingdom whose transmission to humans can prove to be catastrophic for mankind.

FREMONT, CA : The Black Death, the Russian flu and the Spanish flu are some of the events that remind us of the horrors of the past. These circumstances illustrate how the world as a society failed at handling the disease whenever pandemics struck, causing a significant wiping off of the population.

Modern medicine persuaded us that pandemics on such a scale are unlikely in today’s world. The Coronavirus pandemic transformed it all. Now the world has realised the necessity to apprehend pandemics better to impede processes that might lead to another pandemic in the future.

A considerable number of infections demonstrated in humans develop in animals. They pursue a set course before they infect humans:

• The virus originates in the animal kingdom.

• Disseminates domestic animals or those living close to humans.

• Interspecies communication to humans.

• Local spread leads to an epidemic.

• Global spread leads to a pandemic

At any given point in time, countless deathly viruses are existing in the animal kingdom whose transmission to humans can prove to be catastrophic for mankind. On the scale of fatality, Covid-19 stood quite low with a mortality rate of 1-3%, and it still ended up constructing the greatest rupture in modern times.

Role of Humans

While it may appear that humans don't have a part to play in the transmission of a virus to their kind, studies indicate otherwise. After determinating global-level determinants of pandemics, researchers have concluded that future pandemics are most possible to arise from ecological processes of climate change, loss of biodiversity; social procedures kick-started by corporate welfares, developing human culture, globalisation; and population growth.

These processes influence the very nature of relations between humans, animals, and the natural environment. Once the balance is disturbed, the world witnesses unforeseen results, and a lethal new disease could very well be one of them!

How to avoid them

In the Middle Ages--when pandemics strike humans--communities could only infer what lead to them. The dearth of technology and understanding of science deterred them from confirming the sources. Today, the world is equipped with technology and aids that no other civilisation had. The world is capable of hunting a disease right up to its origin and knowing what could have conceivably started it.

Thankfully for humans, the ways to control prospective pandemics are entrenched in sustainable living. Addressing the issues of inadequately planned urbanisation, population explosion, climate crisis, and deforestation, all align with SDGs. What is needed is a global agreement on them and collective action.

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