How are Electronic Health Record and Electronic Medical Record...

How are Electronic Health Record and Electronic Medical Record Different?

Healthcare Tech Outlook | Tuesday, July 20, 2021

The power of an EHR lies not just in the data it holds but also in how that data is shared—health information is made instantly available to authorized doctors across practices and health organizations, allowing for more efficient care coordination.

FREMONT, CA: Although some practitioners use the terms EHR and EMR interchangeably, the advantages they provide are vastly different. A digital account of a chart with patient information recorded in a computer is an EMR (Electronic Medical Record). In contrast, an EHR (Electronic Health Record) is a digital record of health information.

Everything one finds in a paper chart, such as medical history, diagnoses, prescriptions, immunization dates, and allergies, is contained in the EMR or electronic medical record. While EMRs are helpful within a clinic, they are limited in traveling outside of it. In reality, for another practitioner to examine the patient's medical record, it may have to be printed and shipped.

An EHR is a digital account of health data. It includes everything one finds on a paper chart, plus a lot more. Past medical history, vital signs, progress notes, diagnoses, prescriptions, vaccine dates, allergies, test data, and imaging results may all be included in an EHR. Other relevant data, such as insurance information, demographic data, and even data imported from personal wellness devices, might be included.

The power of an EHR lies not just in the data it holds but also in how that data is shared—health information is made instantly available to authorized doctors across practices and health organizations, allowing for more efficient care coordination. Clinicians and organizations involved in a patient's care, such as labs, specialists, imaging centers, pharmacies, emergency rooms, and school and workplace clinics, can access an EHR.

EHRs are the future of healthcare since they give crucial data that can aid in the coordination of care across all healthcare professionals. While both EHR and EMR are widely used terminologies, the term "EHR" is currently more generally used. This is most likely owing to the preference for the word "EHR" by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information (ONC).

CMS usually refers to "meaningful use of an EHR" while discussing healthcare reform. The ONC solely uses the terms "electronic health records" and "electronic health records," noting that the term "health" is more inclusive than "medical." The word "Medical Records" refers to doctor records for diagnosis and treatment, whereas "Health Records" refers to anything linked to a person's overall health. A PHR (Personal Health Record) is precisely that: personal. It refers to the components of an EMR/EHR that a single person "owns" and controls. According to the research, 85.9 percent of office-based physicians utilize some type of EMR/EHR system, while 79.7 percent of the total use a certified EMR/EHR system.

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