How Does Point-of-Care Facilitates Radiology Departments?
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How Does Point-of-Care Facilitates Radiology Departments?

By Healthcare Tech Outlook | Thursday, January 09, 2020

Portable imaging technology facilitates early and less traumatic identification of brain death. By achieving this, point-of-care testing limits non-viable patients from utilizing costly life support devices for a pointless amount of time. In these situations, portable imaging can also reduce expenses.

FREMONT, CA: With enhanced patient care and extended service options, point-of-care aims at offering radiology departments the aptitude to address the existing challenges, such as the risks involving patient transportation. Advancements in point-of-care imaging are shaping the radiology department at different levels.

Decreasing Risk Factors Associated with Patient Transport

Patient transportation is a significant risk factor in hospital environments. According to one review, a few risks associated with patient transport include: potential for infectious exposure, hypoxemia, ventilator-acquired pneumonia, pulmonary complications, cardiac arrest, tachycardia, arrhythmia, equipment dislodgement, and interruption of therapy or care. Vitally ill patients are at the highest risk in such cases, and transporting them can be enormously risky. Often, the risk of moving the patient may even overshadow the benefits. The approach presents a dilemma for clinicians in the hospital.

But, at times, shifting of patients for imaging is desperately required. In such cases, patients often require devices such as oxygen and a noteworthy labor requirement for transit. Therapist, transporter, nurse, and, sometimes even more staff must be at hand for successful intrahospital patient transport. To truly develop patient care, reducing risks associated with transport is critical. Portable imaging can significantly reduce this risk.

In distinction to labor-laden patient transfer, portable imaging only needs one employee: a Nuclear Medicine Technician (NMT), wherein there is no patient transport necessary. This approach not only eliminates the risks associated with patient transportation but trims down the need for costly labor, which is essential to the process.

Point-of-Care Imaging and Brain Death Studies

Portable imaging technology facilitates early and less traumatic identification of brain death. By achieving this, point-of-care testing limits non-viable patients from utilizing costly life support devices for a pointless amount of time. In these situations, portable imaging can also reduce expenses. Proper recognition of brain death is also vital for promoting organ harvesting. Furthermore, mobile imaging can speed up and simplify this process.

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