Oxipit and Parasmed Collaborate to Extend CXR AI Distribution in...

Oxipit and Parasmed Collaborate to Extend CXR AI Distribution in Eastern Africa

Healthcare Tech Outlook | Monday, January 25, 2021

Oxipit has announced, a distributor of medical health solutions located in Nairobi in Eastern Africa.

FREMONT, CA: Oxipit, a medical imaging firm, has announced, a distributor of medical health solutions located in Nairobi in Eastern Africa. The current deal is a significant step towards building a national, local network of Oxipit software distributors, with recent alliances in Nigeria and a strong foothold in Latin America.

Parasmed will work with local high-level medical institutions to analyze its output in the local healthcare setting before using Oxipit software in the Kenyan market. 

"We are starting off with this approach to showcase the software performance utilizing local real-world clinical data, as well as to demonstrate AI workflow for local medical institutions," notes CEO of Parasmed Prof. Osmo Tervonen.

Until joining the collaboration, a range of AI solutions were assessed. Oxipit software, in the words of Prof. Osmo Tervonen, was selected for its diagnostic results. Furthermore, the Oxipit program encompasses the broadest range of radiological respiratory observations, giving radiologists a significant boost in the area.

"Furthermore, Oxipit is present at every step of journey with its distributor partners - research, training, deployment and support," adds Prof. Tervonen.

Like other areas in the developing world, Eastern Africa struggles from a shortage of radiologists and inadequate imaging equipment. In Kenya, there are significantly more than 200 practicing radiologists - a limited number given the population.

"With economic and population growth, AI diagnostic tools are the best bet to bridge the gap of healthcare quality in the developing countries," says the CEO of Oxipit Gediminas Peksys.

Preliminary reports are given by Oxipit chest X-ray diagnostic software for 75 radiological observations, significantly decreasing radiologists' workload in day-to-day operations. More software advances, including autonomous safe patient reports, can even create more cost and resource savings.

"AI diagnostics are already present in day-to-day medical practice. Yet now we are at an exciting stage, where AI diagnostics are moving towards more autonomous operations. The developing countries will benefit the most from this AI evolution, enabling a developed-world level of patient care without the associated developed-world healthcare costs," adds Mr. Peksys.

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