Role of AR/ VR in the Future of Care

Role of AR/ VR in the Future of Care

Healthcare Tech Outlook | Friday, December 18, 2020

With a VR headset, live joint images can be recorded, filmed, and recorded continuously as the patient moves, monitoring the motion range. Since points are taken in 3-D space, the incorporation of live imagery and measurement provides more precision, accuracy, and freedom of movement since there are no device constraints.

FREMONT, CA: Today, Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) are presenting new options to accomplish preferred outcomes in numerous treatment areas or therapy in healthcare. Developments in VR/AR technology offer many pioneering methods in measurement or diagnosis, supervising pain, anxiety, or psychological problems that may eventually replace the traditional ways of doing things.

Below are prime VR/ AR applications in healthcare.

Range of Motion

In general, plastic goniometers have been used to calculate the range of motion. A goniometer is a V-shaped, double-armed instrument that either calculates the joint's angle in the body or enables the object to be rotated to a specific angular location. With a VR headset, live joint images can be recorded, filmed, and recorded continuously as the patient moves, monitoring the motion range. Since points are taken in 3-D space, the incorporation

 of live imagery and measurement provides more precision, accuracy, and freedom of movement since there are no device constraints.

Pain Management

The treatment of pain can be astoundingly simple or complex and depends on a variety of variables. In definition, pain management attempts to identify the structure or nerves in the body that cause pain and offer adequate care. VR/AR is an emerging alternative treatment that could reduce the use of medications. Patients are placed in a safe and calming environment, both visual and auditory, that temporarily alters their perception, thus tricking their brain and providing a diversion from the symptoms that cause pain using sophisticated headsets. Being immersed in such a pleasant environment will improve a patient's sense of control and offer a new healthy way to cope with pain. One particular hope in the medical industry is that VR/AR will reduce opioids in pain control and the potential consequences of addiction.

PTSD

Many war veterans recovering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are now attending expensive and lengthy in-person therapy sessions to deal with the repercussions.  According to research, the same concept of tricking the brain with VR/AR exposure therapy has been influential in treating PTSD.

The therapy can potentially be completed at home without the supervision of a psychiatrist. Yet again, through a headset, an environment can be programmed to help the vet confront feared scenarios or places that might not be safe to experience in real life. Experiences that cause symptoms can be replicated digitally to disconnect anxiety and panic from the original memory.

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