Seven Ways Nurses Utilize Technology For Patient Care
healthcaretechoutlook

Seven Ways Nurses Utilize Technology For Patient Care

By Healthcare Tech Outlook | Thursday, October 17, 2019

The first use of general computers in the medical field was to administer necessary patient information, which still stands true. Computer systems are employed at patient check-in to store patient contact details, pertinent medical history, and insurance information.

FREMONT, CA: The medical arena is growing to be the host for emerging technologies. Alongside, nursing has equally been a very technically advanced field. While the instance is not valid just for the use of computers, now desktops are an integral part of the hospital and private practice culture, and consequently of the nursing profession. In some organizations, specialists are hired who bridge information technology and the nursing world, with an area of expertise in both fields.

1. Patient Administration

The first use of general computers in the medical field was to administer necessary patient information, which still stands true. Computer systems are employed at patient check-in to store patient contact details, pertinent medical history, and insurance information. In larger hospital and office settings, they also control patient flow, keeping track of room or bed occupancy, and room allotment for practitioners.

2. Diagnosis

Electronic health records make it easy for medical professionals to record, recover and manage patient information for accurate diagnoses. Nurses frequently perform routine health assessments like blood pressure, oxygen levels and EKGs. Recording the results of these evaluations is more precise when nurses have the technological skills that facilitate them to save the readings electronically and to store them in a patient’s electronic record. Once captured and recorded, the reports will be instantly available for the entire patient care team. The process thus reduces the need for doctors to make trips to the patient’s room to retrieve diagnostic information.

Today’s technology also enables medics to access essential nursing equipment and key medical references online, reducing diagnosis time and errors. Computer technology also permits nurses to create records that physicians use to update patient treatment orders more competently when the patient’s condition requires it.

3. Electronic Medical Records

As safety, standards are put in place for preserving confidential patient medical data, more hospitals and doctors’ offices are keeping medical records in electronic form. Not only is the approach suitable for the environment, saving millions of reams of paper, but electronic records offer information instantly as a patient moves through their care process. Various specialties and offices have direct access to critical information, and nurses can check allergies and other data with the touch of a button as they make their rounds.

4. Inter-office Communications

Now nurses no more have to write a message and attach it to the patient file or knock on the doctor’s door during an ongoing doctor’s procedure or examination. The advent of computers has made the inter-office communications ever more instant. Email in the medical profession is used just like many others, and most electronic medical records programs offer a notes feature. The attribute allows notes to be attached to patient files just as handwritten notes once were on hard copy files.

5. Telemedicine

Importunate shortages of nursing workforce have left countryside areas and a few underserved urban populations with less admittance to quality healthcare. Nonetheless, telemedicine enables the populace to have the choice of talking about health concerns with nurses, who can assist them in deciding whether or not they need to receive treatment at a medical facility. The field is also useful for patients and seniors who have disabilities, for whom a trip to a doctor is often tricky. Nurses require technology to help outpatients over the phone, wherein nurses record the recommendations using the software, or the document in the patient’s medical record. Additionally, nurses can use software or an application to communicate with other members of the patient’s family members or care team, as desirable.

6. Handheld Devices

A relative newcomer to hospitals and doctors’ offices, handheld devices like Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) have swiftly caught on as a priceless tool. These pocket-sized computers, running specific applications, provide instantaneous access anywhere in the facility to patient information. Additionally, a nurse in the middle of rounds can ask a doctor a question, attaching relevant patient data, and receive an answer even if neither of them is at their desk.

7. Specialty Equipment

Monitors, imaging equipment, and some surgical equipment are now entirely controlled by computers. Nurses are taught to read the output of these machines that have taken much of the human error out of procedures like heart rate monitoring, X-ray alignment, and EKG. Surgical lasers, once aligned by nurses and doctors in most cases, perform procedures by computer control.

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