Telehealth: What are its Benefits?

Telehealth: What are its Benefits?

Alex D'Souza, Healthcare Tech Outlook | Friday, August 13, 2021

Cost savings, adaptability, and the capability to provide care to persons with mobility constraints or those in remote areas who do not have access to a local doctor or clinic are advantages of using technology to deliver health care.

FREMONT, CA: Doctors and other health care workers typically care for their patients in person at a medical office, clinic, or hospital. Medical experts may now diagnose, treat, and oversee their patients' care electronically due to computers, cellphones, and other modern digital technologies.

Telehealth is described as the use of technology to deliver health care services over long distances. It might range from conducting medical consultations over the internet to remotely monitoring patients' vital signs. Its definition is more extensive than that of telemedicine, which is limited to the delivery of health care through the internet. Medical practitioners' training and continuous education are also included in telehealth.

There are three ways to deliver telehealth:

Synchronous—When a doctor communicates with a patient by computer or telephone in real-time.

Asynchronous—When data, images, or messages are documented to share with the doctor later.

Remote Patient Monitoring—When measurements like weight or blood pressure are submitted to the health care provider.

Telehealth's Benefits

Cost savings, adaptability, and the capability to provide care to persons with mobility constraints or those in remote areas who do not have access to a local doctor or clinic are advantages of using technology to deliver health care. Telehealth's popularity has soared in the last decade as a result of these factors. At present, 76 percent of hospitals in the U.S. use telehealth to connect doctors and patients remotely, up from 35 percent a decade ago.

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak, telehealth has become even more critical. Fears of spreading the virus and contracting it during in-person medical appointments have sparked a surge in interest in and use of technology to deliver and receive health care.Almost three-quarters of those polled indicated the pandemic had heightened their desire to explore virtual care. In addition, one in every four Americans over the age of 50 claimed they had a virtual health care visit during the first three months of the epidemic, up from 4 percent of older individuals who had a remote visit the year before.

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