The Rise of Health Technology in Homecare

The Rise of Health Technology in Homecare

Healthcare Tech Outlook | Thursday, May 20, 2021

The Rise of Health Technology in HomecareWith care delivery rapidly extending beyond the hospital's four walls and into patients' homes, the ability to manage the complex needs of a growing aging population depends on embracing seniors' comfort with the digital world.

FREMONT, CA: Telehealth and remote patient monitoring use skyrocketed in 2020, morphing into a care delivery paradigm here to stay, despite being not new. Today's strategies will help seniors stay in touch with their families, home care providers, and doctors, allowing them to remain in their homes with minimal COVID-19 exposure. Proactive treatment that keeps patients out of hospitals will improve, as will staff protection and patient quality, by integrating conventional homecare models with the benefits of modern telehealth.

Health Technology Is Becoming More Prevalent

Although some may discount seniors' technological comfort, the fact is that seniors have consistently demonstrated their ability to use technology to control their wellbeing and are increasingly embracing a digital mindset. In a survey, Americans aged 65 and up expressed a greater willingness to use digital health than other user age groups. This age group is becoming more likely to exchange data from wearables or apps with their health care providers. In the age of COVID-19, as older adults view as tech-averse shifts, the healthcare industry's interaction strategies must adjust to better meet this generation's desire to age in place safely.

The ability to meet the complex needs of a growing aging population depends on accepting seniors' comfort with the digital world. With care delivery rapidly extending beyond the hospital's four walls and into patients' homes, the ability to manage the complex needs of a growing aging population depends on embracing seniors' comfort with the digital world. COVID-19's effect can be mitigated by and the opportunity to meet patients where they are and provide seniors and their families with the tools they need to stay safe at home. Telehealth and remote patient monitoring technologies, for example, would be critical in handling the needs of older patients while keeping costs under control.

In another survey, 91 percent of seniors who used telehealth to access treatment said they had a positive experience, and 78 percent said they would use it again. Telehealth visits not only give seniors peace of mind that their health is in good hands without the need for an in-person visit, but they also give them the tools they need to maintain their health at home. These technologies allow for better resource optimization, improved personnel and patient safety, and the personalized treatment that seniors have come to expect by bridging traditional clinical settings and homecare with technology.

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