What Leads To Communication Gaps in Healthcare?
healthcaretechoutlook

What Leads To Communication Gaps in Healthcare?

By Healthcare Tech Outlook | Thursday, February 06, 2020

Regrettably, medical organizations often fail to benefit from technology in one necessary process: communication. Conventional methods often create decisive communication gaps that hurt collaboration, care, and, eventually, outcomes.

FREMONT, CA: The healthcare industry flaunts some of the most advanced technologies and scientific breakthroughs available today. Concepts that once seemed like science fiction have become a reality. Today, there is a never-ending list of technology applications in fields such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), 3D printing of medical devices or biological materials, robotic-assisted surgeries, remote health tracking, virtual reality. 

Regrettably, medical organizations often fail to benefit from technology in one necessary process: communication. Conventional methods often create decisive communication gaps that hurt collaboration, care, and, eventually, outcomes. Communication breakdowns are happening all through the entire continuum of care. The same way as a small hole in the ship leads to a catastrophic sinking, tiny gaps in the communication can sink the medical practices as well.

It is important to continually inspect the medical practices and see if any gaps will finally become big problems. By arming the clinic with the latest communication developments in technology, one can alleviate the difficulties and widen a healthy range of care experience.

Communication Gaps

Between increased competition, rising deductibles, and falling reimbursement levels, medical practices have lately been tightening their belts to pay for staff, overhead, and other expenses. Therefore, many clinics have been forced to book as many appointments as possible on a particular day.

An average physician sees around 21 patients in a day—leaving a sum of 10-15 minutes per patient. The occurrence means that there is not a lot of time for meaningful communication. Typically, patients have 11 seconds to explain the purpose of their visit before a clinician interrupts. This rushed experience can unintentionally lead to patients being ushered out before fully understanding their treatment or diagnosis plan—eventually leading to patient dissatisfaction and poor outcomes. One big gap in patient communication is the hope that all essential communication will take place during the rushed few minutes.

See Also: Top Artificial Intelligence Solution Companies

Weekly Brief